Leaf springs

From MoparWiki
Jump to: navigation, search




MoparWiki has Tested NEGATIVE for The Corona Virus!


Most of y'all are stuck home and bored. Why not register as a Member, create a MyWiki to get the handle of the Markup Language, and adopt an incomplete Wiki of interest and collaborate on it. Thank You - BK



A leaf spring is a simple form of spring commonly used for the suspension in wheeled vehicles. Originally called a laminated or carriage spring, and sometimes referred to as a semi-elliptical spring or cart spring, it is one of the oldest forms of springing, dating back to medieval times.

A leaf spring takes the form of a slender arc-shaped length of spring steel of rectangular cross-section. The center of the arc provides location for the axle, while tie holes are provided at either end for attaching to the vehicle body. For very heavy vehicles, a leaf spring can be made from several leaves stacked on top of each other in several layers, often with progressively shorter leaves. Leaf springs can serve locating and to some extent damping as well as springing functions. While the interleaf friction provides a damping action, it is not well controlled and results in stiction in the motion of the suspension. For this reason manufacturers have experimented with mono-leaf springs.

A leaf spring can either be attached directly to the frame at both ends or attached directly at one end, usually the front, with the other end attached through a shackle, a short swinging arm. The shackle takes up the tendency of the leaf spring to elongate when compressed and thus makes for softer springiness. Some springs terminated in a concave end, called a spoon end (seldom used now), to carry a swivelling member.



Register to Edit
It takes less than 5 minutes to request registration for editing, and we try to approve within 24 hours. Click the Register Link in the Top Bar.
MoparWiki Help
While editing Wikis may at first glance appear a little overwhelming, it really isn't. You will find this site's HELP (link found in the sidebar) to be very strong and easy to understand. The best way to start is with small edits and working on your user page -- and you will become a Pro in no time.




References